Winter Reading List 2017

Winter is the perfect time to incorporate hygge into your daily life. If you’re wondering what hygge is, it is a Danish concept that defines the feeling of warm, cozy comfort. (You can read more about it in this article I wrote on Womanitely.com a while back.)

With that being said, my favorite way to incorporate hygge into my life is by taking the time to grab a cup of tea, throw on some fuzzy socks and read an interesting book. Here are some of the books that I’ve had my nose in these winter months.

  • Adulting is a Myth by Sarah Scribbles
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    Sarah Scribbles literally draws out what it truly means to be an adult in a comical way that leave you laughing at how true it is. I received this as a gift from Her Campus for my graduation. So, if you know anyone graduating, this is the perfect gift!
  • Capture Your Style by Aimee Song
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    Are you addicted to Instagram? Do you want to improve your aesthetic? Do you love Aimee Song? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you need to grab a copy of Capture Your Style. Song goes in-depth of how to really lock in your own personal style, using Instagram. I’m so glad to have gotten this from the lovely Christina from Tiramisu for Breakfast. Definitely check her out!
  • Facts by Bernhardino Pierre
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    Before I really go into this book, I have to disclose that my cousin actually wrote it. However, I have to say that if you like poetry and someone really laying in the facts to you, this is an amazing ebook to read. If you’re looking for a book with advice on love, life and happiness, I highly recommend this. You can find the ebook here.
  • Sweetbitter by Stephanie Danler
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    If you haven’t heard of Sweetbitter before, I would probably think that you were lying. It’s been on the New York Times list of bestsellers. I’ve just started this book but the style of writing is utterly beautiful. It’s a coming-of-age novel that follows a girl, Tess, who just moved to NYC and finds herself at a job in a restaurant. If you’ve read this, I beg you, don’t give me any spoilers!
  • The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl by Issa Rae
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    True Issa Rae fans unite! I was so excited to open up a gift from my sister to find this. Before Insecure, Issa Rae created the YouTube show, The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl. The show followed the life of “J” who is the epitome of an awkward black girl. I don’t want to give too much away so I’m just going to to say that her new ABC show, Insecure is loosely based off of the YouTube show.
  • You Are a Badass: How to Stop Doubting Your Greatness and Start Living an Awesome Life by Jen Sincero
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    This was another present from my sister for Christmas. I actually haven’t started this one, but as you can tell from the title, it’s a self-help book that looks into helping you from self-doubting yourself. I’m so thankful to have received this book because I definitely am one to self doubt myself. Hopefully, I can get some pointers from Jen Sincero.

If you’re reading anything interesting, I’d love to get some recommendations to add to my bookshelf So go forth and practice hygge, and don’t forget to grab yourself a cup of tea!

10 Books I Will Fight to Read

***Originally posted on HerCampus.com.

I have no problem with someone disliking a book, but when they attempt to hinder me from reading something, there’s an issue. I refuse to allow anyone to stop me from reading a particular book and I encourage everyone else to fight for their right to read. This week VCU Cabell Library has been talking all about banned and challenged books.

There are some things worth fighting for, and I have many books that I will always fight to read.

Harry Potter by J. K. Rowling

If you haven’t heard of the wizarding world, I’m highly concerned. Harry Potter looks at the life of the wizard, Harry Potter, and his friends. It’s been challenged for supernatural themes.

Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

Kite Runner tells the story of a friendship between a wealthy boy and his father’s servant. It’s an emotionally beautiful story that you can learn a lot from. It has been banned for offensive language, being too mature for the age group and violence.

The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger

The Catcher in the Rye is a controversial coming-of-age novel that follows the life of Holden Caulfield. Though originally published for adults, it’s very popular among adolescents.  It was challenged for offensive language, sexual content and being too mature for the age group.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

If you haven’t read this, you’re missing an amazing coming-of-age story that is told by the protagonist, Charlie, who writes letters to a stranger. It’s been challenged several times for offensive language, nudity, drugs and more.

The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Scarlet Letter looks at the life of Hester Prynne, who is shammed by her town in Boston after she conceives a child through an affair. It has been challenged by school districts for being “obscene.”

The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie

The Satanic Verses follows two Indian Muslims who miraculously lived after they were trapped on a hijacked plane that exploded. Salman was accused of misusing his freedom of speech throughout the text and consequentially, the book was banned for being blasphemous.

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

Of Mice and Men tells the story of two men on the search of new job opportunities during the Great Depression. It’s been challenged numerous times because of vulgarity and racist language.

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

If this wasn’t an assigned reading for one of your classes, go out and read it now. To Kill a Mockingbird deals with racial issues in America. It’s been banned for offensive language and racism.

The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

This novel is about a girl named Alice that falls in a rabbit hole into a magical world. It was banned its portrayal of animals with human qualities.

American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis

American Psycho is a novel that looks through the eyes of a serial killer. It’s been challenged in several countries for violence towards women and being harmful to minors.

Every day, books are challenged and even banned from schools and public libraries. Books have been challenged by critics, individuals and groups that have deemed them as unfit for the public because of their beliefs.

For the American Library Association’s Banned Books Week, VCU Libraries has provided a series of interactive events centered around fighting for the right to read. Events will include selfies, a video booth, green screen photos and a lecture from VCU professor, Tom De Haven. For a complete listing of events, visit the VCU Libraries events page.

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